Invasive SpeciesJapanese knotweed

Fallopia japonica
FOUND by Fox
2018-09-12
Bangor
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by Gabby and Sophia
Peer reviewed by Maddie and Adela
Field Notes
We were happy because we were outside in the beautiful weather. We could hear the wind and see many dried leaves. There were some flies and hornets. We found the invasive species very quickly, growing over a fence. the species we found is Fallopia Japonica, or more commonly known as Japanese Knotweed. The dirt underneath was a black, dun color. It has bamboo like stocks because it is native to Asia.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
The things we observed were the leaf shapes, the soil, and the stocks. The leaves were simple, alternate, flat at base and had a pointed tip. The leaves were an emerald green color. The flowers were small and were a white, green color. The inside of the flowers were a slightly darker green. The flowers had five petals each.
Photo of my evidence.
The stocks of this plant were swollen at the joints, like bamboo. The older stocks were a grayish-brown color. The healthier stocks were green and gray. Almost all of the stocks were in the shade. The plant seemed to be growing over the fence, but there were no stocks on the other side. We picked up pieces of old stocks and found out that the stocks are hollow.
Photo of my evidence.
The soil of this plant was moist on the top. The farther down you went the more moist it got. There was very little grass around the Fallopia japonica. The soil had very small rocks inside.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Fallopia japonica
Common name:
Japanese knotweed
Count of individuals: 
50+
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
Flower (plants)
Pollinators (plants)
Sampling method: 
Quadrat (user-placement)
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
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Map this species
Latitude: 
N 44.811117 °
Longitude: 
W -68.755703 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Developed areas
Trip Information
Name:
Cohen School grounds
Trip date: 
Wed, 2018-09-12 09:48
Town or city: 
Bangor
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Upland
Watershed: 
Penobscot
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
20 different species
Evidence of vectors: 
Paved road
Walking trail
People
Tree canopy cover: 
Soil moisture: 

Comments

Wow, that looks like a dense patch. I wonder how long it has been growing in that spot?