Native SpeciesSpotted salamander

Ambystoma maculatum
FOUND by 34bBlueTeam
2015-04-13
Wells Maine
ID Confirmed
Quality checked by m4blue
Peer reviewed by m4green
Field Notes
there was a lot of wind blowing, there were peepers and birds, the vernal pool had dried up a Tad.
A sketch of our study site.
Supporting Evidence
Photo of my evidence.
This is a wide shot of the vernal pool
Photo of my evidence.
We think these are wood frog tadpoles because they are in shallow water and are small, dark and numerous.
Species Observation: Species Looked For
Did you find it?: 
I think I found it
Scientific name:
Ambystoma maculatum
Common name:
Spotted salamander
Count of individuals: 
Coverage: 
Reproduction: 
How big is it?: 
Is it male or female?: 
Sampling method: 
Just looking around
Net
Photo of our sampling method.
Place Studied
We’re sorry, JavaScript is required to view the map. If JavaScript is you may wish to upgrade to a newer browser in order to view this map.
Map this species
Latitude: 
N 43.319827 °
Longitude: 
W -70.594992 °
Observation Site Information
A photo of our study site.
Habitat: 
Upland - Developed areas
Trip Information
Name:
WES Vernal Pool 2015
Trip date: 
Mon, 2015-04-13 16:24
Town or city: 
Wells Maine
Type of investigation: 
Species and Habitat Survey
Ecosystem: 
Freshwater
Watershed: 
Piscataqua
MIDAS Code: 
Habitat Observations
Species diversity: 
Evidence of vectors: 
Water temperature: 
pH: 
Dissolved oxygen: 

Comments

i love the photos that your team took and the wood frog photo is so clear

who did the drawing it is great.

From the photo, it is really hard to tell whether these are Wood Frog or salamander tadpoles- they rtae shaped like salamander larvae but seem almost too dark for young salamanders - the ones we have found in the pool are a light brown in color and have small feathery "gills" or "swimmers" near the head. These look black like small wood frog tadpoles. Your sampling method photois definitely salamander eggs.

Great photos of such small salamander larvae! It is really hard to tell at this size whether they are spotted salamanders or wood frogs, but given that you found salamander eggs, and other groups have been finding much larger wood frog tadpoles, I think that your little amphibians are spotted salamanders.

So do you think that these are wood frogs or spotted salamanders? I'm confused by your second evidence statement. I think that second evidence photo looks like salamander larvae.

-Christine

I also like the picture of the egg mass

thanks!

I liked how you took the picture of the tadpoles it was really detailed

thank you for the awesome comment!!!!!!!!!!